Hyper-V: Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2 from Windows Server 2008 with Hyper-V

In the following post I will describe three methods for upgrading from Windows Server R2 from Windows Server 2008 with Hyper-V. The methods described here are covered in MS Support KB 957256. After listing the methods I will describe why I prefer one of the methods. Before you upgrade. The upgrade process is not complex however you need to be careful. An important first step is to bring all of your virtual machines into a single state. You should review each virtual machine and establish a clean VM to be migrated. This VM must be in a shut down state. … Continue reading Hyper-V: Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2 from Windows Server 2008 with Hyper-V

EBS Fix GAL address lookup TMG

When using OWA (internally or externally in this situation), when one either chooses to search the Global Address List or pages forward from the first 50 members of the list, OWA searches for a few moments and then returns the error: “Could not connect to a directory server.  If the problem continues, contact technical support for your organization.”  This is a known issue and can be resolved using the following method. To resolve this issue, either use Outlook lite (I did not actually try this) or, in the TMG Firewall Outlook Web Access publishing rule, go to the Link Translation … Continue reading EBS Fix GAL address lookup TMG

Best Kept Secret – VHD Native Support in Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7

Have you seen this? WOW. Native support for VHD disks offers huge potential. Think about creating Dual and Tripple boot systems with everything containted in one file per OS. Think about Back up to VHD… think about mounting VHDs for native read write in an OS and then sharing them with a Virtualized OS. This about syspreping an imaged OS for use across your network! Think about it and tell me you are not trying to reattach your jaw,,, Big Secret… now you know. Jeff LoucksAvailable Technology

Top 10 Reasons to Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2008 R2 is the newest Windows Server operating system from Microsoft. Designed to help organizations reduce operating costs and increase efficiencies, Windows Server 2008 R2 provides enhanced management control over resources across the enterprise. It is designed to provide better energy efficiency and performance by reducing power consumption and lowering overhead costs. It also helps provide improved branch office capabilities, exciting new remote access experiences, streamlined server management, and expands the Microsoft virtualization strategy for both client and server computers. Powerful Hardware and Scaling FeaturesWindows Server 2008 R2 was designed to perform as well or better for the … Continue reading Top 10 Reasons to Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows 7 Upgrade Paths

This blog post outlines supported and unsupported upgrade paths for editions of the Windows® 7 operating system. Unsupported Upgrade Scenarios   ·      Upgrades to Windows 7 from the following operating systems are not supported:  ·      Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows XP, Windows Vista® RTM, Windows Vista Starter, Windows 7 M3, Windows 7 Beta, Windows 7 RC, or Windows 7 IDS ·      Windows NT® Server 4.0, Windows 2000 Server, Windows Server® 2003, Windows Server 2008, or Windows Server 2008 R2 ·      Cross-architecture in-place upgrades (for example, x86 to x64) are not supported. ·      Cross-language in-place upgrades (for example, en-us to de-de) are not supported. ·      Cross-SKU upgrades (for example, Windows 7 N to Windows 7 K) are not supported. ·      … Continue reading Windows 7 Upgrade Paths

Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths

Supported Upgrade Scenarios From Windows Server 2003 (SP2, R2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Datacenter Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter Standard Standard, Enterprise From Windows Server 2008 (RTM, SP2) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Datacenter Datacenter Core Datacenter Core Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter Enterprise Core Enterprise Core, Datacenter Core Foundation (SP2 only) Standard Standard Standard, Enterprise Standard Core Standard Core, Enterprise Core Web Standard, Web Web Core Standard Core, Web Core From Windows Server 2008 (RC, IDS, RTM) Upgrade to Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Datacenter Datacenter Core Datacenter Core Enterprise Enterprise, Datacenter Enterprise Core Enterprise Core, Datacenter Core … Continue reading Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths

Hyper-V R2 Video – Issac Roybal

  Issac Roybal is the Product Manager for Hyper-V and spent a few minutes discussing some very late breaking features in Hyper-V coming with the Windows Server 2008 R2 RC release including changes to the number of supported cores as well as an extremely cool enhancement to the new Live Migration feature. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2r9oP_QK0g Jeff LoucksAvailable Technology

Hyper-V and Symbolic Links

 Hyper-V Meta data is stored in the following folder: %SYSTEMDRIVE%\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V\Virtual Machines\ If you open the directory you will see Symlinks to your virtual machine files. If ever the Hyper-V console loses track of your Virtual Machine data you might be able to tell Hyper_V where to look by reinserting the metadata. The following syntax must be run from the command prompt in the system32 folder. mklink “%SYSTEMDRIVE%\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V\Virtual Machines\GUIDMachineFile.xml” “c:\ClusterStorage\Volume1\VirtualMachineName\Virtual MachinesGUIDMachineFile.xml” Example mklink “%SYSTEMDRIVE%\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V\Virtual Machines\4DD127D2-8F04-4B39-85A9-EA679487A9BF.xml” “c:\ClusterStorage\Volume1\JeffVM\Virtual Machines\4DD127D2-8F04-4B39-85A9-EA679487A9BF.xml”  Background Symbolic link From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Not to be confused with SYmbolic LinK (SYLK), a Microsoft Office file … Continue reading Hyper-V and Symbolic Links