.NET on Raspberry PI 2

In a previous blogpost I told about Windows 10 IoT Core. This is great, because you can program in C# and you can add a Graphical user interface to it. But most of the IoT devices will not need user interaction or attached to a Monitor. The most IoT devices collect data and give that to others or keep track of an environment and are only expecting control information. There may be enough reasons to use Windows 10 IoT Core, but it is not necessary for a Microsoft environment. Also on NOOBS (New Out of the Box Software) OS you … Continue reading .NET on Raspberry PI 2

Project Oxford

During the //Build/ Conference they showed a very nice demo; the Photo site (http://how-old.net/). Project Oxford (http://www.projectoxford.ai/) is the base of this app. This API offers a lot of possibilities. The best part, you can use it yourself. There is a fully documented API available. These API’s are for free for now, but it is a lot of fun to play with it. Azure Machine Learning is used for the learning of the API. There is a nice free e-book about Machine Learning. Very readable and gives you some basis knowledge of Machine learning. During the last Ignite Conference there … Continue reading Project Oxford

Windows 10 IoT Core

Since the //Build/ conference is a technical preview of Windows 10 for Raspberry PI 2 is available. With that the promise of Microsoft (Windows on all devices) becomes reality. There will be 3 versions of Windows 10 IoT available: For Industry Devices, Mobile Devices and Core. Installing Windows 10 IoT Core on a Raspberry PI 2 very easy. More information on http://windowsondevices.com and demos http://ms-iot.github.io/content/win10/StartCoding.htm. While installing you will see these screens pass by. The first startup of Windows 10 IoT Core takes a bit longer, some additional setups are being done. No worries next time the startup is fairly … Continue reading Windows 10 IoT Core

IoT (3) Intel Galileo

In my last blog I already told about Microsoft Windows on a Intel Galileo board.  I showed how to show some texts on a LCD display with C++ code. Not long after that the second generation of the Galileo board came. It was a little more powerful. In my last blog I had to connect my LCD display via a breadboard to my Galileo. Not uncommon in the Arduino world, but it doesn’t look nice and is very error-prone for not very technical people. So I bought a Seeed Grove Starter Kit. Another advantage of this kit it contains different … Continue reading IoT (3) Intel Galileo