Introducing EffectiveIoC

Last week I tweeted a few times about writing an IoC container in less than 60 lines of code.  I also blogged about how I thought the average IoC container was overly complex and didn’t promote DI-friendliness. Well, EffectiveIoC is the result of that short spike.  The core ended up being about 60 lines of code (supported type mappings—including open and closed generics—and app.config mappings).  I felt a minimum viable IoC container needed a little more than that, so I’ve also included programmatic configuration and support for instances (effectively singletons).  I’ve also thrown in the ability to map an action … Continue reading Introducing EffectiveIoC

Azure Table Storage and the Great Certificate Expiry of 2013

I won’t get into too much detail about what happened; but on 22-Feb-2013, roughly at 8pm the certificates used for *.table.core.windows.net expired.  The end result was that any application that used Azure Table Storage .NET API (or REST API and used the default certificate validation) began to fail connecting to Azure Table Storage.  More details can be found here.  At the time of this writing there hadn’t been anything published on any root cause analysis. The way that SSL/TLS certificates work is that they provide a means where a 3rd party can validate an organization (i.e. a server with a … Continue reading Azure Table Storage and the Great Certificate Expiry of 2013

async/await Tips

There’s been some really good guidance about async/await in the past week or two.  I’ve been tinkering away at this post for a while now—based on presentations I’ve been doing, discussions I’ve had with folks at Microsoft, etc.  Now seems like a good idea to post it. First, it’s important to understand what the "async" keyword really mean.  At face value async doesn’t make a method (anonymous or member) “asynchronous”—the body of the method does that.  What it does mean is that there’s a strong possibility that the body of the method won’t entirely be evaluated when the method returns … Continue reading async/await Tips

IDisposable and Class Hierarchies

In my previous post, I showed how the Dispose Pattern is effectively obsolete. But, there’s one area that I didn’t really cover.  What do you do when you want to create a class that implements IDisposable, doesn’t implement the Dispose Pattern, and will be derived from classes that will also implement disposal? The Dispose Pattern covered this by coincidence.  Since something that derives from a class that implements the Dispose Pattern simply overrides the Dispose(bool) method, you effectively have a way to chain disposal from the sub to the base. There’s a lot of unrelated chaff that comes along with … Continue reading IDisposable and Class Hierarchies

The Dispose Pattern as an anti-pattern

When .NET first came out, the framework only had abstractions for what seemed like a handful of Windows features.  Developers were required to write their own abstractions around the Windows features that did not have abstractions.  Working with these features required you to work with unmanaged resources in many instances.  Unmanaged resources, as the name suggests, are not managed in any way by the .NET Framework.  If you don’t free those unmanaged resources when you’re done with them, they’ll leak.  Unmanaged resources need attention and they need it differently from managed resources.  Managed resources, by definition, are managed by the … Continue reading The Dispose Pattern as an anti-pattern

Introduction to Productivity Extensions

The .NET Framework has been around since 2002. There are many common classes and methods that have been around a long time. The Framework and the languages used to develop on it have evolved quite a bit since many of these classes and their methods came into existence. Existing classes and methods in the base class library (BCL) could be kept up to date with these technologies, but it’s time consuming and potentially destabilizing to add or change methods after a library has been released and Microsoft generally avoids this unless there’s a really good reason. Generics, for example, came … Continue reading Introduction to Productivity Extensions

Leave predicting to meteorologists and fortune-tellers

There’s a couple of good axioms about software design: You Can’t Future-Proof Solutions and the Ivory Tower Architect You Can’t Future-Proof Solutions basically details the fact that you can’t predict the future.  You can’t possibly come up with a solution that is “future-proof” without being able to know exactly what will happen in the future.  If you could do that, you shouldn’t be writing software, you should be playing the stock market. Ivory Tower Architect is a software development archetype whose attributes are that they are disconnected from the people and users their architecture is supposed to serve.  They don’t … Continue reading Leave predicting to meteorologists and fortune-tellers

And the winners are…

Kevin Davis and by David Williams. Please send me an email (via link at left) so I can send you details. (function() { var po = document.createElement(‘script’); po.type = ‘text/javascript’; po.async = true; po.src = ‘https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js’; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();

Developer Fitness

No, this isn’t something about Fitnesse, it’s really about physical fitness.  Caveat: I’m not a doctor. Another conference under my belt: //Build/.  There seems to be a trend of private discussions at conferences (maybe it’s just me) about the sizes of t-shirts at developer conferences and how the average size is, well, above average. There seemed to be a few conversations about fitness as well, at least in the context of losing weight.  Let’s be fair, being a developer is not kind to the body.  We sit around, usually inside (in the dark) staring at a computer screen (or screens).  … Continue reading Developer Fitness

Win a free copy of Visual Studio 2010 Best Practices

Win A free copy of the ‘Visual Studio 2010 Best Practices’, just by commenting! We’re giving away two ebook editions of Visual Studio 2010 Best Practices. All you have to do to win is comment on why you think you should win a copy of the book. I’ll pick a winner from the most creative answers in two weeks. (function() { var po = document.createElement(‘script’); po.type = ‘text/javascript’; po.async = true; po.src = ‘https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js’; var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(po, s); })();