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Its mandatory Jim but not as we know it

Posted by: | July 23, 2014 | No Comment |

A uestion was asked on the forum about whether a parameter could be made mandatory sometimes and nor other – in particular if a parameter could be made mandatory if another parameter was used.

My initial thought was that it couldn’t but a little experimentation with parameter sets produced this:

function test {

[CmdletBinding()]
param (
[Parameter(Mandatory)]
[string]$Param1,

[Parameter(Mandatory)]
[string]$Param2,

[Parameter(ParameterSetName = ‘Set1’)]
[switch]$Param3,

[Parameter(ParameterSetName = ‘Set1’,Mandatory)]
[Parameter(ParameterSetName = ‘Set2’)]
[string]$Param4,

[Parameter(ParameterSetName = ‘Set2’)]
[switch]$param5
)

"parameters accepted"

}

The function doesn’t do anything – its just to demonstrate the parameters

So this works:

£> test -Param1 x -Param2 y
parameters accepted

These work

£> test -Param1 x -Param2 y -param5
parameters accepted

£> test -Param1 x -Param2 y -param5 -Param4 z
parameters accepted

So you see that param4 when used in parameter set set2 is not mandatory

However,

£> test -Param1 x -Param2 y -param3
cmdlet test at command pipeline position 1
Supply values for the following parameters:
Param4: a
parameters accepted

So when you use parameter 3 you’re in parameter set set1 and param4 becomes mandatory.

Bit messy with the parameter decorators but it gets the job done

under: PowerShell

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