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The source of PowerShell cmdlets

The source of PowerShell cmdlets seems to cause a lot of confusion.

The first point is that the PowerShell team, and now the open source project, are only responsible for the PowerShell engine and the core modules – basically most of what you’ll find in C:\Program Files\PowerShell\6\Modules\

CimCmdlets
Microsoft.PowerShell.Archive
Microsoft.PowerShell.Diagnostics
Microsoft.PowerShell.Host
Microsoft.PowerShell.Management
Microsoft.PowerShell.Security
Microsoft.PowerShell.Utility
Microsoft.WSMan.Management
PSDesiredStateConfiguration
PSDiagnostics
PSReadLine
ThreadJob

 

You’ll also find

PackageManagement
PowerShellGet

 

But they aren’t classed as part of the core engine.

 

ALL other PowerShell functionality comes from one of these sources:

- Modules created by other Microsoft teams and shipped as part of Windows 10 or Windows Server

- Modules installed when a Windows feature is installed – again created by the appropriate team

- Modules installed when the Remote Server Admin Tools (RSAT) are installed (can overlap with the preceding group)

- Modules available when an application is installed e.g. Exchange or SQL server

- Modules available from the PowerShell Gallery e.g. Pester

-Modules available from third parties

 

The only area the PowerShell team control is the core group of modules mentioned at the beginning. For problems with anything else you should raise the issue with the appropriate team or vendor rather than the PowerShell project.

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