Server 2016

Promoting a new domain controller

I’ve been working with Windows Server 2016 CTP5 recently, and because I installed it without the Desktop Experience (what we used to call a Server Core installation), I’m having to do everything in Windows PowerShell. No complaints, I enjoy it, but it does force me to think about things a bit sometimes.

One of the tasks I needed to do was promote a new server to be a secondary domain controller. The PowerShell command for this is: Install-ADDSDomainController. But before you start promoting a new DC, it’s a really good idea to test that the promotion will succeed by using the Test-ADDSDomainControllerInstallation cmdlet. So, I combined the two steps into a simple script that allows you to run the test, and if the output looks clean, finish the installation and initiate a reboot.

The script is smart enough to realize you haven’t installed the ActiveDirectory feature yet, and goes ahead and installs it for you.

<# 
.Synopsis 
Tests a candidate domain controller, and then promotes it to DC.

.Description 
Promote-myDC first tests if a domain controller can be successfully promoted, and, 
if the user confirms that the test was successful, completes the promotion and 
restarts the new domain controller. 

.Example 
Promote-myDC -Domain TreyResearch.net

Tests if the local server can be promoted to domain controller for the 
domain TreyResearch.net. The user is prompted after the test completes 
and must press the Y key to continue the promotion. 

.Parameter Domain 
The domain to which the server will be promoted to domain controller. 

.Inputs 
[string] 

.Notes 
    Author: Charlie Russel 
 Copyright: 2016 by Charlie Russel 
          : Permission to use is granted but attribution is appreciated 
   Initial: 05/14/2016 (cpr) 
   ModHist: 
          : 
#> 
[CmdletBinding()] 
Param( 
     [Parameter(Mandatory=$True,Position=0)] 
     [string] 
     $Domain 
     )

Write-Verbose "Testing if ADDSDeployment module is available" 
If ( ! (Get-Module ADDSDeployment )) { 
   Write-Verbose "Installing the ActiveDirectory Windows Feature, since you seem to have forgotten that." 
   Install-WindowsFeature -Name ActiveDirectory -IncludeManagementTools 
   Write-Host "" 
}

If ( ! (Get-Module ADDSDeployment )) { 
   throw "Failed to install the ActiveDirectory Windows Feature." 
}

Write-Verbose "Testing if server $env:computername can be promoted to DC in the $Domain domain" 
Write-Host "" 
Test-ADDSDomainControllerInstallation ` 
      -NoGlobalCatalog:$false ` 
      -CreateDnsDelegation:$false ` 
      -CriticalReplicationOnly:$false ` 
      -DatabasePath "C:\Windows\NTDS" ` 
      -DomainName $Domain ` 
      -LogPath "C:\Windows\NTDS" ` 
      -NoRebootOnCompletion:$false ` 
      -SiteName "Default-First-Site-Name" ` 
      -SysvolPath "C:\Windows\SYSVOL" ` 
      -InstallDns:$true ` 
      -Force 
Write-Host "" 
Write-Host "" 
Write-Host ""

Write-Host -NoNewLine "If the above looks correct, press Y to continue...  " 
$Key = [console]::ReadKey($true) 
$sKey = $key.key

Write-Verbose "The $sKey key was pressed." 
Write-Host "" 
Write-Host "" 
If ( $sKey -eq "Y" ) { 
   Write-Host "The $sKey key was pressed, so proceeding with promotion of $env:computername to domain controller." 
   Write-Host "" 
   sleep 5 
   Install-ADDSDomainController ` 
      -SkipPreChecks ` 
      -NoGlobalCatalog:$false ` 
      -CreateDnsDelegation:$false ` 
      -CriticalReplicationOnly:$false ` 
      -DatabasePath "C:\Windows\NTDS" ` 
      -DomainName $Domain ` 
      -InstallDns:$true ` 
      -LogPath "C:\Windows\NTDS" ` 
      -NoRebootOnCompletion:$false ` 
      -SiteName "Default-First-Site-Name" ` 
      -SysvolPath "C:\Windows\SYSVOL" ` 
      -Force:$true 
} else { 
   Write-Host "The $sKey key was pressed, exiting to allow you to fix the problem." 
   Write-Host "" 
   Write-Host "" 
}

	                    
	                

Set Network Location to Private in Windows 8 & 10 and Windows Server 2012 & 2016

One of those annoyances that sometimes happen with the new Network Location in Windows 8.x and Windows 10 is that the network gets mis-identified as Public when it should be Private, or the other way around. Changing this in the GUI is certainly possible, but annoying, so let's take advantage of the improved Windows PowerShell support in Windows 8.1 (and later) and do it quickly and easily. First, let's open up an elevated PowerShell window from our limited user session:

PSH> Start-Process WindowsPowerShell.exe -verb RunAs

Now, in that window, let's find out what our current network location is set to:

PSH> Get-NetConnectionProfile
...<snip>...
Name : Unidentified network
InterfaceAlias : vEthernet (Local-10)
InterfaceIndex : 18
NetworkCategory : Public
IPv4Connectivity : LocalNetwork
IPv6Connectivity : LocalNetwork

From this, we see that the problem interface has an Interface Index of 18, so:

PSH> Set-NetConnectionProfile  -InterfaceIndex 18 -NetworkCategory Private

And we're done.

ETA, 3 August, 2016 -- this same problem exists in Windows 10/Server 2016. And the solution is the same. Set-NetConnectionProfile is your friend!