Spyware Sucks
“There is no magic fairy dust protecting Macs" – Dai Zovi, author of “The Mac Hacker’s Handbook"

Installation tips for IE7 Beta 2 Preview

January 31st 2006 in Uncategorized

Update: This content is being duplicated at http://www.ie-vista.com/known_issues.html so that it can be easily updated… please refer to that page for the latest content..


Some may not agree with the following, but years of experience have shown this to be best practice… [;)]



  1. Set a restore point (just in case)
  2. Disable antivirus
  3. Shut down all running programmes (except for firewall) – that includes Messenger, Windows Defender, OneCare – don’t forget to exit via systray icons as well.
  4. Turn off Automatic Updates (believe me, you’ll thank me later)
  5. If you have installed IE7 Beta 1 or the leaked build 5299 you must uninstall those versions before you try to install Beta 2 Preview.
  6. Reboot *twice* after removing old beta builds (yes, it really does make a difference)
  7. Don’t forget to shut down those programmes again before proceeding.  This is where shutting down automatic updates makes a difference.  Uninstalling beta builds of IE7 in the past has, for me, triggered Automatic Updates to offer a slew of updates which is darned irritating if Automatic Updates is set to download and prompt to install, or download and install automatically.  I’d prefer you didn’t install these updates before installing IE7 Beta 2 Preview.  After the installation of IE7 Beta 2 Preview you can turn Automatic Updates back on – you won’t be prompted install all those updates.
  8. Install IE7 Beta 2 Preview… reboot twice after successful installation.
  9. Don’t forget to re-enable your antivirus now you’re finished.

Important tips:



  1. This Build only installs on Windows XP SP2 – builds for x64 and Server 2003 will come later.
  2. Windows Genuine Advantage Validation is an integral part of the IE7 Beta 2 Preview installation.   If your copy of Windows is not genuine you will not be able to install the Beta.
  3. Internet Explorer 7 Beta 2 Preview is build 5296.  The leaked build from a couple of weeks ago is Build 5299.  I recommend you get rid of 5299 and install 5296 – even though the build number is lower, it is actually more stable (See Tony Chor’s explanation about the difference in build numbers here – http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/comments/520812.aspx)
  4. If you previously used Sean Alexander’s registry script to add a slew of Search Providers, all the entries created by the script will be broken. This is because the Wildcard has been changed from %s to {SearchTerms}.  You’ll need to edit the original registry file to replace %s with {SearchTerms} then remerge the file, or edit the registry manually.
  5. Installation errors referencing msfeeds.dll should be fixed by following the instructions in this newsgroup post:
    http://www.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/list/en-us/default.aspx?dg=microsoft.public.internetexplorer.general&mid=93b16c74-ccbf-4f7e-8582-d406c87f7fdd
  6. IE7 Beta 2 Preview may cause confusion for people who use Outlook Web Access – see my previous Blog post:
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/spywaresucks/archive/2006/01/31/82198.aspx
  7. You may not be able to view Windows Live Messenger Beta chat history – this is a known bug – fix may be to move your history folder to a directory without spaces in its name (eg: create a folder called c:\history and use that).
  8. McAfee Security Centre may be broken – displays a blank screen – no fix yet.
  9. History may be broken – previous day’s folders may not open – try logging in using a different administrator account, then delete the history folder for the affected user.
  10. IE7 enables ‘clear type’.  If you don’t like it, turn it off via Tools, Internet Options, Advanced, Multimedia tab.  There is a bug where ClearType continues to affect OE even when disabled – no known fix for that yet.

Sometimes the installation may fail – no error message.  Right click on the downloaded IE7 installation file, select properties, then select “unblock”


 


2 comments to...
“Installation tips for IE7 Beta 2 Preview”

Nikolai Lalev

There is weird bug, within the installer procedures.
The case is this –
While i was trying to uninstal, the Beta 1 build which i was using, until now – the IE Beta 1 selection, is removing itself ok, from the Add/Remove window, but stil nothing happens – the uninstal procedure, doesn’t initialize, beta 1 i still there, and i can’t install Beta 2.
Guess the problem is from me, for not closing the active windows of IE 7 Beta 1, and then perhaps the uninstal procedure for IE7 Beta 1 is failing somehow ..
But i think is at least, not in favor in IE Dev Team, for such a bug..

One of my coleagues already, installed the Beta 2 – it is great :)) But, about my problem ? Can u propose some kinda of suggestion,cause i can’t now uninstall beta 1, neither i can install beta 2 ??



Eugene Quah

I have the same problem as Nikolai, IE 7 Beta 1 would uninstall despite being uninstalled using Add/Remove Programs. However, I discovered a way to trick the IE 7 Beta 2 installer to proceed anyway with IE 7 Beta 1 installed. Here are the steps :

1. Open “C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe” using the Visual Studio C++ IDE.
2. Double click the iexplore->Version->1 node of the resource editor.
3. Edit the file version information using the resource editor. Change all 7.xx.xxxx.x to 4.xx.xxx.x to trick the Beta 2 installer. Just change the major version numbers, the minor build numbers have no effect.
5. Save your changes.
6. Shut down all instances of IE 7 Beta 1.
7. Run the IE Beta 2 installer.

Installation should from this point onwards proceed without any problems. Enjoy!


Symptom:  When using the IE7 Search Toolbar the text  %s  is populated into the search field of a Search Provider instead of the search text entered by the User.
Fix: Reinstall your search providers.
Click on the drop down arrow to the right of the Search Pane, then select “Get Search Providers”.
Click on the link for each […]

Previous Entry

Getting weird crashes that nobody seems able to fix? Crashes that don’t make sense to the professionals?
Watch out for overclocking: two parties who know what they’re talking about, and whose jobs include trawling through errors reported via the Error Reporting Tool (yes, those reports you send in when a programme crashes really *are* read and […]

Next Entry

Archives