My Blog is Moving

Hi folks – It’s that time again. Time to move my blog. Currently, my block is hosted on the MSMVPs site. It’s been a good place overall for my blog, but lately I’ve decided that I really want to take blogging more seriously, and the only way to do that is to do it right. The previous host seemed to have some stabilities issues, but I was happy there. Now, my blog is on my own domain, http://vcsjones.com. For now I will continue to cross post onto my old blog, but if you do have RSS feeds of Bookmarks to … Continue reading My Blog is Moving

Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 5 – Working with the DOM

Internet Explorer is known for having a quirky rendering engine. Most web developers are familiar with with concept of a rendering engine. Most know that Firefox uses Gecko, and Chrome / Safari use WebKit. WebKit itself has an interesting history, originally forked from the KHTML project by Apple. However pressed, not many can name Internet Explorer’s engine. Most browsers also indicate their rendering engine in their User Agent. For example, my current Chrome one is “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.1; en-US) AppleWebKit/534.7 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/7.0.517.44 Safari/534.7” Not as many web developers could name Internet Explorer’s, it was simply … Continue reading Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 5 – Working with the DOM

Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 4–Debugging

 Picking up where we left of with Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension, debugging is where I wanted to go next. I promise I’ll get to more “feature” level stuff, but when stuff goes wrong, and it will, you need to know how to use your toolset. .NET Developers typically write some code and press F5 to see it work. When an exception, the debugger, already attached, steps up to the plate and tells you everything that is wrong. When you write an Internet Explorer Extension it isn’t as simple as that. You need to attach the debugger to an … Continue reading Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 4–Debugging

A Really Super Light and Simple IoC Container for Windows Phone 7

I finally managed to get the Windows Phone 7 tools installed. I’m not going to vent on that anymore because I feel like I’ve done that enough already – and once they did install correctly they’ve been very pleasurable to use. I started working on an application, and old habits die hard. I like Inversion of Control, it’s a major need for me simply because I’ve forced my mind to work like that. I’ve previously worked with Unity and Windsor. Unity has grown on me a lot, and I like it. However, none of them seem to work in Windows … Continue reading A Really Super Light and Simple IoC Container for Windows Phone 7

My Netbook Vaio P running Chrome OS – The Experience

I have a small little netbook, a Vaio P. It’s a cool little laptop, and I took it in favor of a clunker laptop. It handles 95% of my needs, and it’s actually pretty fast. a 128 GB solid state drive, and 2 GB of (non upgradable) RAM. It ran Windows 7 perfectly, only hiccupping on performance when it came to video and medium to large Visual Studio solutions. But I didn’t get it for development, I got it for a browser and a chat client (this was pre-iPad days). I figured if all I used it for was that, … Continue reading My Netbook Vaio P running Chrome OS – The Experience

The vCard

My MVC site will have a little bit of social networking in it. One of the requirements is to be able to export a contact into a vCard. vCard is an exchange format used like an electronic business card. It’s the format that is used by Outlook, Thunderbird, or even Apple’s iPhone when exchanging contacts. It’s an open standard, the latest version is 3.0 specified in RFC 2426. It’s been around for a while, too. The 3.0 specification was put out in 1998. It’s been 12 years, and not much as changed with the vCard. This specification was put out … Continue reading The vCard

The Power Struggle of FilterAttribute

I’ve been doing a lot of MVC2 work lately, and have been indescribably thrilled with how easy it is to write clean code with it (or at least what I consider clean code). Being able to Unit Test my Controllers and have separation from everything else is like magic. OK, maybe I am a little late to this ballgame. I discovered a very cool feature of MVC2, and that is the FilterAttribute. When reading documentation about how to ensure controller actions could only be run if the user was Authenticated, I naturally came to the AuthorizeAttribute. It was that simple! … Continue reading The Power Struggle of FilterAttribute

Fading Controls with Mouse Movement in WPF

This is an off-topic post from my IE Extension Writing (which I am working on, I promise!). I was playing with a WPF app;It’s a simple photo viewer. I wanted the UI to be “control-less” and only show the picture. However I also wanted some user interface elements to it as well. I decided to take the approach of using controls that will sit overtop of the image, and only fade them in when there is mouse movement, and then fade them out when the mouse is idle. Sort of like how Windows Media Player works when viewing a video … Continue reading Fading Controls with Mouse Movement in WPF

Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 3

I’m debating where to take this little series, and I think I am at a point where we need to start explaining Internet Explorer, and why writing these things can be a bit tricky. I don’t want to write a blog series where people are blindly copying and pasting code and not knowing what IE is doing. I am not a professional at it, but I’ve written browser extensions for most popular browsers. IE, Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. In terms of difficulty, IE takes it. That’s probably why there isn’t a big extension community for IE. Let’s go in the … Continue reading Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 3

Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 2.5

When we last discussed wiring events in part 2, we discussed how events work and how to wire them, and more importantly how to unwire them. I also mentioned that we could use attachEvent and detachEvent rather than the events on interfaces. This is useful if you don’t know what type of element you are attaching an event to. attachEvent and detachEvent attachEvent is part of the IHTMLElement2 interface, and fortunately all elements and tags implement this interface, so long as you are targeting Internet Explorer 5.0+. attachEvent takes two parameters, a string indicating which event to attach to, and … Continue reading Writing a Managed Internet Explorer Extension: Part 2.5