High Resolution Screens and Tablet PCs – Part 2

What can you do with a high resolution screen?
Previously: Part 1

Click the thumbnail at the right to see a screen shot of my Toshiba
M200 in Secondary Landscape mode. That’s 1400 x 1050 with two
browser windows. These two browser windows are approximately
700 x 1040 each. Not quite as wide as Portrait mode for most
Tablet PCs (768 x 1024) but, hey there’s two of
them.  

It’s an odd thing, but I don’t connect the M200 to an external
monitor very often. Sometimes, just because it is easier than running
wires I will just use MaxiVista to another machine. That’s another
story for another day.

click for full sized image


mouse over the full sized image and look for this button to actually see it full sized. To
get the full effect when you view the image in IE, mouse over the
bottom right corner of it and click the “Expand to Full Size”
button. In the Mozilla browsers just click the image.

Here’s another example with a browser window on the left and a
MindMap on the right. I work like this a great deal. That is, I’ll be
looking at something on one side of the screen (typically the left
side) and thinking, pen in hand, usually with MindManager or Alias
Sketchbook Pro a note taking application.

click for full sized image

See the world in Tablet Portrait Mode (768 x 1024)

One last little oddity for the day… Here’s a a bookmarklet to
switch your browser window to 768 x 1024
for a different perspective on things if you are not running in that resolution in Portrait mode now.

Now go back and look at those full sized images and see just how much scrolling you have to do to see everything.

 

If you found this interesting you might like to read:
Size Matters – Artist

One thought on “High Resolution Screens and Tablet PCs – Part 2

  1. Really interesting reads.

    Having an Acer with 1024×768 it’s natural to go Portrait so without using a Tablet with a larger screen it would never occur to me to use landscape mode as it currently feels so natural to just go portrait and replicate paper.

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